Sunday, April 30, 2017

April Came and Went

April went by really quickly. Seems as though I was just working on the March Twitter round-up. But here we are, another month, and still alive under the Turnip.

There was a wide range of thought about current policies and general destruction from above, both domestically and internationally:

The administration attacks the crime approach of NYC — America's safest large city — then invites admitted killer, Philippine President Duterte, to White House.
Preet Bharara‏

I have been to interpretive dance performances which contain more detail on the tax code.
Justin Wolfers‏

It's clear that Sessions' real beef with New York City is that a thriving, safe, multiracial society is against everything he stands for.
Ned Resnikoff‏

It's weird the active campaign to make America white through mass deportation and racial terror isn't a more central issue in our politics.
sean.‏ @SeanMcElwee

Internet users deserve no privacy, but lobbyists visiting the White House do. #thruthelookingglass
Lessig‏

Imagine having the constitutional responsibility to hold a dangerously flailing President in check and completely, utterly blowing it. [With photo of Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell]
Schooley‏ @Rschooley

The cost of Betsy DeVos’s security detail: $1 million per month.
adam harris‏ @AdamHSays

About half (47%) of Latinos say they are worried that they or someone they know might be deported.
@PewHispanic

This GOP only knows how to break things and go nuclear and that's increasingly not looking like a metaphor.
Joe Hill‏

The war on terror has created more terrorists. That's the sad reality. We can't bomb away a barbaric ideology.
Linda Sarsour‏

It cost $314M to drop that bomb. We could have funded the National Endowment for the Arts for two years with that money. #ArtNotBombs
@KennyCoble

Just 6% of Americans think ISPs should be able to sell browsing history. 93.4% of House Republicans voted for that.
@MEPFuller

Americans need to take a long look in the mirror and consider our stance on war. To the detriment of social programs and peoples' well beings, we build the largest arsenal by ludicrous degrees. We barely blink when the largest bombs are dropped, while civilians are massacred. It's not even a major item in the news anymore. Our media is set up to glorify acts of aggression, to never question their goals or logic, but to drool over military hardware. Meanwhile our culture, our shows, our movies and video games, further than glorification. We teach children that war is a game. The military industrial complex has been so completely absorbed by culture that you can't tell anymore where one ends and other begins. This isn't the kind of country I want to live in. I'm tired of blood on my hands. This machine has to change.
Jared Yates Sexton‏

Trump White House:
-Assad is literally worse than Hitler
-His victims are not welcome here
Zach Wahls

It's a strange ethic that drops bombs to honor the dead while denying help to the living.
Rev. Dr. Barber‏

Syria strike is to foreign policy as Carrier deal (remember that?) was to trade policy: impresses the rubes, but basically meaningless.
Paul Krugman‏

I'm tired of people who evoke emotions to stoke fears of refugees with innuendos but dismiss emotions when it compels compassion for them.
Ayman Mohyeldin‏

It's a lot easier to convince people they're in danger than it is to convince them that they're safe.
Ryan Dow‏

Military Industrial Complex has this country trained like a dog. Missiles launch and the anthem plays and every pundit salivates and salutes.
Jared Yates Sexton‏

somehow i stay surprised by elite fetishization of state violence
Mazel Tov Cocktail‏ @AdamSerwer

Wagging the dog won't distract us from your war on US democracy. Bombing Syria won't distract us from your Syrian refugee ban.
Heather C. McGhee‏

What matters is making more U.S. veterans so that we can tearfully honor their service while not giving them medicine or housing.
William K. Wolfrum‏

There's a reason defense takes lion's share of the federal budget while citizens suffer. Turn on your TV and bask in military fetishization. We can't get experts on TV about poverty or education, but lob a few missiles and watch the retired military brass drool over war.
Jared Yates Sexton‏

Watching mostly positive coverage of the Syria attack on the Fail To Learn The Lessons of History Channel.
Frank Conniff‏

i hate how weaponized native names are in the military. black hawk, tomahawk, mowhawk shawnee, choctaw, chinook, apache, cayuse, ute, etc
christie‏ @sapsikwala

1. Authorizing airstrikes has earned Trump a good amount of praise.
2. Trump will reliably do anything that yields applause.
Jamelle Bouie

It is possible to disagree about what to do in Syria, or even not to know how you feel. It is not possible to believe we're in good hands.
Mark Harris‏

OUT: debating whether the US should be the world's policeman
IN: debating whether the US should be the world's drunk, racist policeman
David Klion‏

The Stupidest part about Trump and DAPL and #KeystoneXL is that IF it were REALLY about jobs, renewable energy creates more jobs than oil.
BigIndianGyasi‏
Plus a few specifically on Neil Gorsuch rising to the Supreme Court:
This is the second time Republicans have lost the national popular vote, won the presidency, then reshaped the Court. And reshaped it in a way that has opened the door to sweeping assaults on voting rights and voter access.
Jamelle Bouie

If you ever see Neil Gorsuch be sure to say.
"Hi, Merrick Garland!"
He'll say, "I'm not Merrick Garland."
And you say, "You should be!"
LOLGOP‏

The twist: The filibuster was finally killed for the nominee of a president who lost the popular vote and is polling at 40% or lower.
Dave Weigel‏

When McConnell deprived President Obama of a vote on Garland, it was a nuclear option. The rest is fallout.
@RepAdamSchiff

Republicans furrowing their brows and decrying partisanship after 8 years of treating President Obama like a home invader is rich indeed.
@JoyAnnReid
There was, of course, general angst about our so-called president and his family:
Wonder how the number of Trump's most frequently used words would compare to the number of words understood by dogs.
Tom Tomorrow

I still see liberal/left people say all the time how they think Ivanka or Melania is ugly. Their beauty is not their inherent worth, guys. Ivanka is flouting anti-nepotism laws and making money off of the White House. That's what matters. Not her shiny hair and pencil skirts.
Erika Heidewald

Trump has met with an average of two CEOs a day, not counting those he golfs with.
Shadow Cabinet‏

Here's the poster I designed for tonight's Signs of Resistance protest poster show, benefitting the ACLU:


Carolyn Porter‏ @porterfolio

Winning makes you more accountable to the American people, not less.
Evan McMullin‏ (retweeting Trump when he bragged yet again about winning the Electoral College

1 Trump Mar-A-Lago visit = *5 years* of Presidential salary.
So far Trump has blown *35 years* of presidential salaries on Mar-A-Lago trips.
Adam Khan‏ @Khanoisseur

It would have been so much cheaper if we just got Donald Trump a tutor rather than making him president.
Dean Baker‏

Obama walked on ice and never fell.
Trump is falling flat on his face over the Easter Egg Roll.
Hemant Mehta

In prepping the book, what I've learned is that Donald Trump isn't a political conservative but a cultural one. The divide is vast. Cultural conservatives don't care about policy. They just want shows of strength and actions that oppose progressivism. It doesn't matter if it's interventionism or corporate welfare, they want someone to oppose anything that makes life better for liberals. Trump is a mascot, a figure that upsets liberals. That fact is way more important than any policies or philosophies he could hold. The divide has been there for years and was given credence by the GOP using the Tea Party movement to their advantage while not address its concerns. Trump supporters' main concern is cultural representation for whites and rural voters, It has nothing to do with policy or doctrine.
Jared Yates Sexton‏

Huge thanks to @PissedModernism for featuring my Red, White and Blue piece:

nicole a phillips‏ @typographHer

Trump's not even playing chess. He's cheating at Candyland and the mainstream media is all "How amazing, he can count and knows all his colors!"
Sarah Kendzior‏

Is anyone truly shocked Trump doesn't ask for consent in any area of his life?
Aparna Nancherla‏

We have to say out loud that the President of the United States is an unhinged dumbass. We're in extreme danger.
@prisonculture

Must suppress the existential horror. Must suppress the existential horror. Must suppress the existential horror. Must suppress the existent
Tom Tomorrow‏

Bears repeating that we got here because Donald Trump is incapable of watching a partisan propaganda network and recognizing the lies.
Jared Yates Sexton‏

Media: "Hillary's messaging was too focused on how bad Trump would be."
Also media: "How come nobody told us how bad Trump would be?"
The Resisterhood‏

So, where are the pieces full of sympathy for the communities that didn't vote for Trump that are suffering as a result of his election?
Mikki Kendall‏ @Karnythia

Income inequality does not explain the rise of Trumpism/populism. Geographic inequality + racism does.
Richard Florida‏

Lawyers for the President of the United States say that you assume a "risk of injury" by protesting at a Trump rally. That's dictator talk.
A Cat Named Bitches‏

Here is why Trump voters should be held accountable: he is doing what he advertised. They just thought his cruelty wouldn't touch them.
Jamil Smith‏
It was a month of marches (about Trump's tax, science, and finally climate change), but most of these are from the science march:
Re: #ScienceMarch
Science is good. But like religion, it has to address historical harms it's done to oppress oppressed communities.
BigIndianGyasi‏

Ask the GOP about Climate Change: "I'm not a scientist!"
But when it comes to women's choices, they're all doctors.
Ricky Davila‏ @TheRickyDavila

"Flint is what happens when we dismiss science. Flint is what happens when we dismiss experts." — @MonaHannaA
Ayana Elizabeth J.‏ @ayanaeliza

I like science policy how I like my isotopes. Stable.
Anna Cutmore‏ @Cutmore4

What we are all in some sense marching for is a desire to not be bossed around by monopolists and political autocrats.
Matt Stoller‏
There were quite a number critiquing capitalism and especially income and wealth inequality:
The U.S. trade deficit is actually smaller than it looks. Almost half of it might just be tax havens.
Noah Smith‏ @Noahpinion

Remember: The college wage premium is rising because high school wages are falling, NOT because college wages are rising.
Jeff Spross‏

It's time for Democrats to run on expanding Social Security, Medicare-for-all, childcare and green infrastructure:


sean.‏ @SeanMcElwee

America lacks any creative public policy initiatives because its money is permanently wrapped up in unequal wealth.
Langdon Winner‏

The lifecycle of a typical person's peak labor market value and peak family expenses line up very poorly.
Matthew Yglesias‏

Incomes for D.C families overall have risen, but in the two poorest wards they've fallen. We concentrate poverty.
Rachel Cohen

When I view the trust fund "rich kids of Instagram" I'm always amazed by the abstinence, the rewarded patience.
Mike Konczal‏ @rortybomb

Since 1952, corporate profits have risen dramatically while corporate tax revenues have plummeted:


Economic Policy Institute

Where there is extreme poverty, there is extreme violence.
@FeministaJones

I was reading an essay in The American Conservative (or National Review?) the other day arguing airlines and cable companies are why people hate capitalism. There are a lot of bigger, better reasons to hate capitalism but none of them are as petty and annoying as having to talk to Verizon support which seems to exist mostly as a bajillion-dollar rejoinder to the idea of the efficiency of the market.
Gene Demby‏

Blood-boiling: 2016 Wall St. bonus pool could pay all 3.2 million fast food workers $15/hour with $776 million left.
@BillMoyersHQ

If the current medical market had to deal with polio, "we'd never have a polio vaccine. Instead we'd have iron lungs in seven colors with iPhone apps.”
igorvolsky‏ (quoting an NPR story on how the U.S. health system became big business)

Funny how we never call tax breaks for having kids for middle to upper class people "welfare." Or mortgage tax breaks "subsidized housing."
Heidi‏ @laflaneuse

Trump is weak. So let's see a powerful Democratic articulation of a new approach to trade, a new support of small biz, a new trust busting! The people who wanted to drain the swamp still want that. So let's take corruption seriously, propose changing how we fund campaigns, lead!
Zephyr Teachout‏

People who see the world through class lens and people who see it through identity lens are both so valuable right now. Play together. And please stop fighting each other while an authoritarian buffoon eats your country. You each see something worth seeing. Play together.
Anand Giridharadas‏

Maybe if we broaden the definition of national security to include health of our people, planet, etc. we can "find the money" as in wartime.
Stephanie Kelton‏

Nominal average hourly wages would have been $3.22 higher in March if wages had grown at prerecession levels:


@EconomicPolicy

The free market hates places where it's hard to make a buck; rural areas can expect to be increasingly abandoned in free market country
@palan57

Hard to have a second job when the first one won't tell you what your schedule is for the next week until the night before.
Julie Erick‏
This month’s tweets about racism include a sidebar on Asians as the “model minority,” plus the usual white supremacy, and everything that flows from it:
"I voted for Obama twice" is the new "I have a black friend.”
Imani Gandy

Communities of color have gone without sufficient press coverage for eons. Where was all the consternation about “media bubbles” then?
Jamil Smith‏

When you talk about the Civil War being about money, not slavery, you can't just leave out that slaves were the source of the money.
Ashley C. Ford

I don't want to hear how black folks selling weed should find other careers when white folks make middle class wages doing the same thing. Weed shouldn't be legalized unless it's done in ways that create pathways to opportunity for those who've been in this economy informally.
Samuel Sinyangwe‏

Revitalization of poor places should focus first on creating wealth for existing residents. Prosperity shouldn't only be an invasive import.
Rik Adamski‏

You can't be anti-participation trophies and pro-Confederate statues. They are the world's biggest participation trophies.
Larry Beyince‏ @DragonflyJonez

Complainy white guys: people used to be able to take a joke.
Everyone else: people used to *have* to take the joke. Big difference.
Melissa Torres‏ @agoodlibrarian

Historian Eric Foner: "All the major questions before us — racism, rights, citizenship, democracy, terrorism — are Reconstruction questions."
Timothy P. McCarthy‏ @DrTPM

For white celebrities to see/discuss problems with representation, they'd have to acknowledge the systems that led to their rise are racist. As a society, and in every industry, we are so obsessed with the idea of meritocracy and rising on your own talent/hard work/merits etc.
Nicole Chung

U.S. preoccupation with morality of drug use enables racist drug policies, Dr. Carl Hart says at Johns Hopkins University.
The Hub‏ @HubJHU

White people opposing diverse representation is akin to a narcissist saying, "Why do other people need mirrors? They can just look at me!"
Foz Meadows‏

They complained Obama went to Harvard, but he was the same year as Gorsuch. They complained he golfed, but Trump golfs more. It was racism.
Kaivan Shroff‏

"We'll get to Civil Rights after we defeat banks" doesn't sound any better than "We'll campaign against lynching after we get the vote.”
Mikki Kendall‏ @Karnythia

White America: Asian Americans aren't a rhetorical device you can use to denigrate Black people. #YourModelMinority believes #BlackLivesMatter
Mark Tseng-Putterman‏

Protip: When reading right-wing pundits, remember that "I admire Asian people" nearly always translates as "I despise black people.”
Jeff Yang

"Other ethnic minorities have done well!" is an idiotic argument against "anti-black racism foundational to America" aka white supremacy.
Wesley Lowery‏

Racism is based in denial. Projection is another element: "You're a racist for pointing out my racism." This is why the oppressed should define racism.
Barbara Arnwine‏ @barbs73

The difference between Black Americans and black immigrants from other countries is DuBois' double consciousness. African Americans have been forced for generations to consider how whites see them in how they maneuver the world, not black immigrants. Blacks in Nigeria do not think of themselves vis-a-vis the white gaze. They are forced to learn it in the US, but do not internalize it. If Black Americans talk about how US whites see us as all the same, it has little resonance for immigrants with little double consciousness. For black immigrants, especially from Africa, there is a process of learning how whites see you and deciding to consider in future social action. The development of a double consciousness is passed down across generations for Black Americans through ethnic socialization in the US. A double consciousness is very much a US phenomenon and shouldn't be taken for granted as the only way to be black in the world.
Chinyere Osuji‏

The thing some people WILL NOT understand is that avoiding the word "racism" won't make racists listen. Nothing will. You can't reason with it. Bigotry at its core is *irrational*. They got there thru fear; nothing to do with logic. It's a panic attack... that harms others. What we ought to do with bigots? Put them in the societal equivalent of a "calm-down" room. What we actually do? Put them in political office.
N. K. Jemisin‏

I largely ignore popular discourse about Black people's relationships, families, etc. How can you [participate in the discourse] when antiblackness is rampant? A strange nation that invented an entire fake disease to explain why we'd run away from slavery (drapetomania) honestly has nothing to say. There's no conversation about how the current regime's immigration policies affect Black immigrants, especially Black Muslims.
Ebony Elizabeth

do y'all remember in-depth stories checking in with black voters every week while obama was in office?
Mazel Tov Cocktail‏ @AdamSerwer

White people admonishing black people to be colorblind is like the walking telling those shackled to the ground to ignore the restraint.
Charles M. Blow

It's not that I have to talk about race. It is that I have to talk about power. And in talking about power, I then have to talk about race.
Angela Dye, PhD‏ @ejuc8or

As of 4/1/17 police have killed 303 people in the US. News coverage has decreased. The violence has not #WhyIResist.
Samuel Sinyangwe

Myth: Racism declines with time.
Reality: Racism adjusts, falls and rises in line with prevailing political norms.
Khaled Beydoun

If white America is in ‘crisis,’ what have black Americans been living through?
Gene Demby‏
I tried not to pay attention to the Kendall Jenner/Pepsi ad thing, but a few tweets got through, nonetheless:
The Pepsi ad is not "wrong." It's dead right as a archetype of how many white folx view justice. Purchaseble. Accessible.
BigIndianGyasi‏

*smiling black man approaches cops with gift of Pepsi*
Subsequent headline: No Charges Against Officers Who Thought Pepsi Can Was Gun
Jason Miller

Just occurred to me that the Trumps and the Kardashians are the exact same kind of people.
Robert O. Simonson‏
There was another set of tweets specifically about the travesty of United Airlines dragging a passenger off an airplane:
White people talking about "compliance" [with authority] is like ringer at the shell game talking about their winnings. The game only works that way for you.
jay smooth‏

Fascism doesn't look like jackboots dragging a man off a plane. It looks like people defending it.
@EmilyGorcenski

Take note of the people in your life who think that guy "should've just got off the plane.”
These are the people who report their neighbors.
so-called "simon"‏ @stillwellgray

Imagine sitting down at a restaurant, paying for meal up front, then being told to leave the table so an employee can eat your meal instead.
Matt McDermott‏

RE: United Airlines but also much more: our nation's airports and transit systems = a petri dish for cultivating compliance, indifference to state violence. It's visible in the actions of Customs and Border Patrol, in the absurdity of security theater protocols, the power-tripping of many TSA personnel. We queue up, willingly, to have our bodies scanned, touched and searched, we're crammed into ever more contorted spaces - and we accept it all.
Moreover, these spaces = murky ecology of both public institutions and private enterprises, with huge subsidies yet relying on low-wage workers. Unsurprisingly (and terrifyingly), they're also where we see ever-increasing limit-testing of respect for legality and basic rights claims, which take advantage of both dubious public/private structures and, even more importantly, a cultivated ethos of exhaustion and alienation.
I know we like to imagine we're all going to resist "Fascism" when it shows up but when TSA or CBP pulls someone out of line in front of you to take away for questioning, pretty much all of us have been disciplined instead to be busy being pissed about taking off our shoes. And even so, many responses to the video of this man being brutalized are about accepting the frame, the terms of system, seeing it as outlier, an excess. "They went too far" "Why do they overbook" "Why didn't they offer more money" "I will boycott United.”
Sure, these make some sense, but the blunt reality is that, legally speaking, they can do pretty much ALL of this and, normatively speaking, our years of acceptance of runaway security culture (and other trends) means that we've cosigned their doing it. Namely: what many decry as exceptional behavior (by state, corporations, and bystanders) in these specific spaces (airports, transit) are in fact de rigueur parts of life in countless other spaces in the U.S., signally with regards to policing and control in marginalized communities. Violent disciplining of people simply moving from point A to B isn't just for planes and in terminals: it's for buses, schools, and sidewalks too.
Patrick Blanchfield‏

we make glorious flying machines that can cross seas and mountains — and then leave insufferable bigoted shitheads in charge of who can fly
Saladin Ahmed‏

I just want someone from United to explain the phrase "refused to volunteer" to me.
Alt-Thin Brown‏ @jteeDC
There were just a few about education:
Amazing how homework defenders get away with saying “Maybe no academic benefit, but homework teaches self-discipline, responsibility, time management…” Zero research support. In 12+ yrs I've been unable to find a single study that supports this folk wisdom about homework having nonacademic advantages.
Alfie Kohn‏

Merit pay is offensive. It is driven by belief student learning is mostly about effort and within teacher control. Both are false.
Paul Thomas‏ @plthomasEdD

The Charter Paradox: Charters claim "We need to be relieved of bureaucracy, have professional autonomy to INNOVATE!" If that is true, JUST GIVE THAT TO ALL PUBLIC SCHOOLS!!!
Paul Thomas‏ @plthomasEdD

Don't arm school police.
ACLU National
And a small set specifically about climate change:
The question that climate change skeptics and deniers can never answer is: Why not just be on the safe side?
Robert O. Simonson‏

Global warming doubt among Americans has fallen to a record low 15%, as temperatures climb.
Brookings

Today, for the first time since the lights came on, the UK has gone 24 hours without coal-fired generation.
Bill McKibben

The globe hasn't had a cool month in 628 months:


Climate Central

In 2016 alone, US solar created more new jobs (51,000) than there are coal miners still working in the US (50,200).
David Roberts
As usual, I flagged quite a few tweets about livable, sustainable cities:
Thousands of years creating cities for PEOPLE; last 80 for cars and destroying the "people" in cities. Walk, bike, use public transit. People first.
G_Penalosa‏

Simple solution: make buses fare-free and respond to demand. Why is it not being done? Because too many powerful people profit from sprawl.
Free Public Transit‏

Drivers are like 2-year-olds on every level. "Make roads smooth so I can smash them again with my car! Smash smash!!"
Father Sonn‏ @mikesonn

Inconvenient parking is inherent to walkable urbanism; unwalkability to ultra-convenient parking. Both can be mitigated, but not eliminated.
Rik Adamski‏

How do place-making and walkability go together? Window transparency: 70–90% glass at street level makes pedestrians feel much safer.
@saintpaulbike

Giving examples of road diets throughout the country. Business jumps 30%, noise drops 70%, crashes drop by half. Seattle has done over 40 road diets to date. Has found that the more diets they do, the more neighborhoods want them.
@saintpaulbike

Enhanced crosswalks are eight times more visible than parallel lines:


@saintpaulbike

Stop proclaiming support for things like equity or safe walking or biking if you aren't going to make the real harder choices to support it. At a certain point, which doesn't take very long, you really aren't for those things if you don't change current practices. Period.
Heidi‏ @laflaneuse

"Parking influences the way cities look and how people travel around them, more powerfully than almost anything else."
Strong Towns‏

I think you all know how I feel about home values and the city's role. But I'll say it again: THE CITY OWES YOU NOTHING ON YOUR INVESTMENT.
Father Sonn‏ @mikesonn

Safety is achieved not by removing "marginal" people (except the few who are dangerous) but by attracting many different kinds of people.
Rik Adamski‏

Cities mandating that stores charge shoppers 25¢ for each bag but not a penny for parking is an interesting climate action priority.
Alex Steffen

Demanding ample free parking in intense urban places is as unreasonable as demanding booming nightlife in the country and must be called out.
Rik Adamski‏

When people have transportation choice, they will discover the subsidy of cars too much burden.
Free Public Transit‏

We don't build the way we do in the US because it's inherently "more affordable." If it were, the rest of the world would build this way, too.
Rik Adamski‏

Traditional towns feel good to people, not because of nostalgia, but because they derive from millennia of trial and error (i.e. ancestral wisdom).
Rik Adamski‏

Cars are like cigarettes. Our kids and grandkids will be shocked that so many lives were taken by them, and that we enabled it at every step.
Christina Morrison

For all the buzz over "first mile/last mile" strategy, transit works best when it can be reached on foot.
TransitCenter‏

Human birthrate must fall, and fast. Make cities car-free, educate all children, improve child health. But capitalism is busy with oil wars.
Free Public Transit‏

Again: move people, not vehicles:


21st Century City‏ @urbanthoughts11
This month, there were enough tweets about women to warrant their own section:
Summary of the hashtag #ThingsOnlyChristianWomenHear: "Christianity teaches that men are in control of everything except their own sexual desires."
Adam Gaylord‏ @AuthorGaylord

Dress modestly because men are too weak. Also men are in charge of you because they are spiritually superior #ThingsOnlyChristianWomenHear
Stephanie Long‏ @Stephanielong85

These [lost] retail jobs — in clothing and apparel, department store, etc — are disproportionately held by women, and women of color in particular. The political salience of an industry is tied to how that particular kind of work is raced and gendered. A jobs crisis that hits women, and black women in particular, will not inspire the same national attention as one that hits white men. You won't have politicians barnstorming the country promising to reopen [all the closed] malls and department stores. And this is beyond the fact that the perceived worth of those jobs — what we think laborers can expect in compensation — is also tied to this. (See the incredulity and outrage in some quarters at the idea that a fast food worker deserves a living wage.)
Jamelle Bouie

Over 11,766 women have been killed in domestic-violence homicides since 9/11.
The Nation‏

Teach yourself not to be obsessed with your daughter's sexuality. Even when it's cloaked in religion it's creepy as fuck.
(((MissysaurusRex)))‏ @missykaybm [replying to a tweet that read, “Teach your daughters to keep their virginity until marriage. Even on products it's written 'do not purchase if seal is broken’.”

I have literally never heard a woman refer to anyone as a "beta." Only men’s rights activists do that.
@peatonx

Unequal pay leaves many low-income African American women without a ladder to economic security. #EqualPayDay:


@MomsRising

Street harassment goes beyond sexual abuse. Its a systematic effort to keep women off the streets, limit their access and deny agency.
Trisha Shetty‏

I am so much more likely to buy goods from a company that treats its workers well, than a company that touts feminism in its marketing.
Ashley C. Ford
It was a month of outrage and defensiveness about the nature of free speech:
Free speech is NOT anybody gets to say anything any time. To watch so-called smart people act as if it is = embarrassing. In the US wealth determines who gets to speak and whose speech matters. THAT is the damned problem, not hate-monger Coulter being shut down.
Paul Thomas‏

You know who goes around saying you have a moral obligation to engage with people behind podiums? People behind podiums.
Angus Johnston‏ @studentactivism

Please remember that right-wing outrage at "intolerance" is entirely disingenuous and serves only to guilt people into allowing them back in.
Vex, Night Creature‏ @andreuswolf

Racism is not a "viewpoint that deserves to be heard." How many times must this be said?
roxane gay
And, last of all, the best of the rest:
Never underestimate where you will encounter genius: my cashier at Cub [supermarket] made lyrics about my groceries while ringing me up (in two languages).
Carolyn Porter‏ @porterfolio

OG range map for American Bison:


William Lindeke‏

More young Republicans know a millionaire (28%) than even one Muslim (22%). Fascinating stats on political sorting.
Brian Klaas

[In the] Audit of North Carolina’s 2016 vote, they found 1 fraudulent vote would've been prevented by voter ID law. Out of 4.8 million cast. Voter ID laws are the real fraud.
George Takei

On this day in 1886, the New York Times declared the fight for the 8-hour work day "un-American" and said it would lead to gambling and debauchery.
Nat Sowinski‏

Use of "politically incorrect": a smug way to imply the problem is with those who are offended, not with the offensiveness of the comment/behavior itself.
Alfie Kohn‏

Why numbers are sometimes better than words.
What people think you say “almost certainly,” “probably,” or “highly unlikely”:


Max Roser

cancer ain't a damn battle it's biology
Xeni Jardin

When you've harmed someone you really can never go wrong with the "listen, apologize, and listen some more" strategy.
wikipedia brown‏ @eveewing

75% of the US STEM workforce is white. 49% of the workforce is white men. White men are 31% of US population.
Dr. Chanda @IBJIYONGI

If the world were a 100 people, over 2 centuries. As we muck around in our daily tribulations, good perspective:


jennifer keesmaat

Obtaining a #voterID requires financial resources — disposable cash low-income workers just don't have. #RestoreTheVRA:


Democracy Awakening‏

As far as I can tell, a "snowflake" is just anyone you're mad at online who spells better than you.
Molly Hodgdon‏ @Manglewood

Have I mentioned my theory that Amelia Bedelia is secretly an anarchist performance artist intent on slowly destroying the Rogers' sanity?
Maggie Koerth-Baker

I think kindness is often confused with niceness. Niceness gets us nothing - kindness is about how we connect with people. Just my 2 cents.
Leslie Mac‏

Textile artist Magda Sayeg transforms urban landscapes by decorating everyday objects with colorful knit and crochet works:


@womensart1

In general, I'm a staunch believer that just because I had it more difficult than someone else, that doesn't mean they need that hazing.
Ebony Elizabeth

Honestly, if that guy thinks his [Wall Street] bull statue represents "freedom in the world, peace, strength, power and love," he's really lost.
Robert O. Simonson‏

New York Times columnists now include two white men named David, a climate change denier, a man who supports banning abortion and zero women of color.
sean.‏ @SeanMcElwee

I think that I shall never see / A poem as lovely as a WHAT THE HELL IS THAT:


Darryn King‏

You can't start teaching slavery in 1619, or begin mentioning Native peoples and First Nations in 1492. Disservice. You have to start earlier.
You must teach:
1) There were viable African kingdoms that people were taken from, and
2) Native peoples had rendered the Americas habitable.
For instance, enslaved Africans actually came with agricultural skills and trades. Humanity *came from Africa.* Those were ironworking cultures.
And the so-called "breadbasket of America" had supported agricultural civilization that "mysteriously collapsed" (from new disease epidemics).
Teaching that the Americas were empty lands, and that the Africans brought here in chains to work them were stupid really isn't what happened. Native peoples and First Nations had been on these continents for at least 14,000 years. Africans were on ours since the human species began. It's revisionist history to pretend that humans who had been just fine since the dawn of time were improved by that violence. Miseducation.
None of these places were empty before they were conquered. Neither were they dysfunctional; otherwise, there would've been no one *there.* The mistake is to assume that what we became after disastrous encounters with conquerers, settlers, and slavers is what we have been always.
If you teach that, you're part of the problem. Because you're not teaching what actually happened, and why. You cannot teach those initial encounters the way that we were taught them - that European imperial victories were totally assured. Late medieval and early modern Europe was NOT (!!!) Europe of the late 18th, 19th, and early 20th century. The scales weren't that unbalanced yet.
Ebony Elizabeth

The most daring thing to do with your life is to create stable communities in which the terrible disease of loneliness can be cured.
Kurt Vonnegut‏

Your perspective is not the truth.
Daily Zen‏

There are two distinct stories. Manufacturing share has been been declining for 50 yrs. That's automation. The plunge from 2000-2007 was trade.
Dean Baker

Christianity died when "Do you have a personal relationship with Jesus?" replaced "Do you belong to the saving community of Jesus?" Christian faith is personal not individualistic, public not privatistic. It means you belong to a community and there are expectations of you.
Renita Weems‏ @somethingwithin

We win the war of ideals every time if we ground it in peace, love, education and equality.
BigIndianGyasi

Y'all get mad about SINGLE PAYER? For 10% the price of Iraq War, every American could have platinum health care. Wake up.
Mike Cernovich

Jessie Newbery (1864-1948), Scottish Arts and Crafts movement artist and embroiderer, known as one of the 'Glasgow Girls’:


@womensart1

“I think that the biggest thing people need to embrace is discomfort.” —Roxanne Gay
Poets & Writers‏

I guess what I'm saying is that precarity + cults of personality has created a CLUSTER of what it means to be a "valuable" academic. And the anxiety and fear and competition this breeds means less emotional energy available to just focus on nurturing our own research.
Dr. Lucia Lorenzi‏ @empathywarrior

Pro-tip: Rikers Island bears the name of Richard Riker, the city recorder who sent blacks back to slavery in the south without fair trial.
Mara Gay‏

Nice eyelashes!


Faces in Things‏

"What I see is a society on the verge of collapse," said one of my international colleagues recently. They're not wrong. Either power will be shared, or this nation won't survive. We really are at a "change or die" moment. The crisis is here.
Ebony Elizabeth‏

Saturday, April 29, 2017

A Blade, a Bag, a Box

I spent most of the day at my ward's caucus and political convention waiting to "vote" for someone who may be the next mayor of St. Paul. Even though it got done almost in time, I didn't go to the climate march because all of that in the morning and early afternoon gave me a migraine.

So for today, three photos from the basement, taken in 2015:


I couldn't get a good shot of this razor blade, but I liked the lettering and texture behind it.


This Morton Salt bag is the quintessence of workman-like. Fun detail: Just below where it says Morton Salt Company are the words ADDRESS CHICAGO. Not sure if it was supposed to include an address in Chicago, or if that was intentional.


The script lettering on this box was too fun to overlook.

Friday, April 28, 2017

100 Days

So the Turnip didn't realize being president would be so hard. I have no trouble believing he was stupid enough to think being president was easier than being a branding and real estate mogul, but I do find it a bit hard to believe he would admit it. His stupidity knows no end, it seems.

Maybe that's why he's assigned these jobs and even more that aren't listed (like Middle East peace) to his son-in-law who has no experience in any of these things:


(ABC News graphic)

Despite my continued outrage at the Trump Circus, it just can't be sustained. I feel as though I am living in an alternate reality created by a supremely bad writer.

Meanwhile, art continues to be created in response:


Seen at the Hamilton Ink Spot, downtown St. Paul.


Seen at the wacpac (Whimsical Alternatives Coalition Political Awareness Consortium) on Snelling Ave. in St. Paul.

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Greetings from Curt Teich

I recently came across these early-1950s postcards in some family papers:




At first I thought I would just post the vibrant, evocative artwork because it's worth sharing, but then I noticed the little words in the lower left corner of the Miami card: Curt Teich & Co., Inc.

And now I know that Curt Teich was a German immigrant to the U.S. who started a printing company in Chicago in 1898 at the age of 21. He came from a family of printers. The "greetings from" format originated in Germany, but Teich brought it to our shores after visiting his native country in 1904. His crew of hundreds of salesmen worked with businesses across the country to create idealized images of their places and sell them to the newly mobile public.

Teich lived to be 97. He died in 1974 and the company closed in 1978. Its archives are in the midst of being transferred to the Newberry Library in Chicago.

Consisting of over 360,000 images related to more than 10,000 towns and cities in the U.S., Canada, and 115 other countries, the Teich industrial archives also contains photographs, prints, sketches, and other layout materials documenting the creation of many of the company’s postcards.
Yet another reason to visit that amazing place!

Here are three online archives of Teich postcard images:
To see the collection at the Newberry in person, find out the details here.


Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Absurd Products

I've just heard of The Grommet, a catalog that aggregates inventions to sell to consumers. Some of the items are mildly interesting, but more are ridiculous. I laughed out loud at a few.

First was the Trtl:


It's not so much the product in this case (though that's funny enough). No, it was the photo of this guy in his plaid shirt with his dark facial hair blending into the dark fabric of the neck restraint. Really a bad shot. It's almost as if his jaw has gone into another dimension.

Then there was the Couch Coaster:


Which is such a quintessentially modern American product. How much of a couch potato would you have to be for it to be worth it to have such a thing? How often would you use it? But that's just it; The Grommet doesn't exist so much for you to buy things you need and will use; it's so other people can buy gifts they think their friends or family will use.

And finally, the Critter Catcher:


That is so, so lame. Why not buy a three-foot piece of plastic when improvising with something like a broom and dustpan you already own would do just as well. Oh, I see, it makes it possible to capture the creature without harming it.

Don't care. It's still a lame waste of plastic.

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Good Riddance to the Liberty Square Monument

Yesterday, the city of New Orleans removed a monument, with workers starting before dawn to decrease attention. When they tried to remove the monument at an earlier point, the contractor's car was burned. This time, the monument was removed without incident.

I had assumed the monument marked some aspect of the Civil War, but no. It commemorated the so-called Battle of Liberty Place, which happened during Reconstruction in September 1874. Like the Wilmington Massacre, it was an example of white supremacists trying to overthrow an elected multiracial government.

The White League (also called the White Men's League) fought the duly appointed police of New Orleans, killing 100 people. Just another example of Blue Lives Mattering, I guess. They were finally defeated by U.S. troops sent in by then-president Ulysses S. Grant.

None of the White League members were ever charged with a crime.

The presidential election of 1876 saw the Congressional compromise that led to the end of Reconstruction (when Republican Hayes was elected president with a minority of the popular vote). By 1891, New Orleans was firmly in the hands of white supremacists and they erected the monument to praise the insurrection. In 1932, an inscription was added that read in part:

United States troops took over the state government and reinstated the usurpers but the national election of November 1876 recognized white supremacy in the South and gave us our state.
I'm glad it's gone. This is one that's not even worth keeping in a museum, in my opinion. The history of what happened in Liberty Square is important to know and preserve, but the monument itself should end up on the trash heap of eternity.

Monday, April 24, 2017

The Ugliest Shoes

Another random-photo-from-my-iPhoto-archive post for today:


Taken in September 2013, as seen at TurnStyle in Roseville, Minnesota.

Sunday, April 23, 2017

Ebony Thomas on Black Names

It's common among white Americans to disparage black people for naming their children as they do. There is clear evidence that people with “black” names are discriminated against in job searches. In the past, I’ve cited Ta-Nehisi Coates on this topic, when he wrote,

Would love to read a history of naming. Strongly suspect that there's nothing particularly original about "making up" names. So much of this just comes down to cultural ("racist") snobbery. You hate "Shaniqua." But why precisely? Seriously why? ...not sure why naming your kid "George Washington" because you think he'll have presidential properties is any more legit.
Ebony Thomas (@Ebonyteach), assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education, yesterday tweeted a series of thoughts on this that I found instructive and want to be able to refer to later:
Nothing's wrong with our names. I'm glad that my name is Ebony. It signals my ethnicity. Something IS wrong with antiblackness, though.

We face discrimination [from] our names not because of what's inherent in a particular collection of sounds, but because racism exists.

Black American coined names are just more evidence of our creativity. For instance, some parents will use a portmanteau of their own names.

Our names? Handed down from history. Linguists can tell you about the La- prefix's origins from Creole, Greek names from enslaved ancestors.

Whatever you think of their politics, "Barack" and "Condoleezza" aren't exactly "Jack" and "Jill." They were who they were even with their names.

Stop repeating deficit, antiblack nonsense. Your screeching and laughter about our Black American names sounds like nails on a chalkboard.

Our names have deep meaning. This noise is nothing but antiblack, poverty-shaming, slavery-denying ignorance.

Black Americans can't pull our names from other cultures without being accused of appropriation OR coin our own names without being shamed.

(If we have names from Arabic or African languages? We're appropriating.
European or Asian ones? We're wannabes.
Invent our own? Ha! Memes!)

We even somehow "taint" names that came from other languages or cultures if we bestow it on too many of our kids. Exhibit A is "Tyrone."

Poking fun at the descendants of enslaved people (torn from their ancestors!) for having the audacity to freely choose names is disgusting.

You don't hate the name. It's a *word.*
You don't hate the way it's spelled, either, because you're speaking English.
You hate us.
/rant
That point about Tyrone is a good one (as are all her points, of course). Just as Evelyn became a woman's name, despite Evelyn Waugh, Tyrone is now a black name, despite Sir Tyrone Guthrie.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

March for Science

Minnesota got the good weather for the March for Science, while it was raining in Washington, D.C. Lots of photos.

First, the sign I made:


(I made a mistake in the spacing on the last line, so rather than waste a piece of cardboard I improvised.)

There were a lot of people there. I'm hearing estimates of 10,000, but if the Women's March was 100,000 as reported by police, I'd guess it was at least 20,000 from how long the march was and how full the area in front of the Capitol was.










This sign was made and carried by the child hidden behind the guy in the brown jacket:


It amused me because she has a pegasus unicorn saying that science is real. Not sure if it's intended to be ironic or not.
















Looking through the photos I've chosen here (out of two or three times as many I took) I realize I've selected a disproportionate number about climate change. But that's a major part of why the denigration of science matters, in my opinion, so I can't apologize.

Friday, April 21, 2017

Northern Spark

For today I went to a random spot in my iPhoto library and found these photos from June 2015. They're from Northern Spark, an all-night art festival in the Twin Cities that's been happening for about five years.

Northern Spark is known for the works that use projection onto buildings, and 2015 was a good example of this. People at the festival could have their live images projected onto the grain elevator adjacent to the Mill City Museum in Minneapolis:


That was pretty cool.

The other installation I took a lot of photos of that night was called mini_polis. It was an idealized, miniature version of Minneapolis by Niko Kubota, Jon Reynolds, and Micah Roth. When I was there a live concert was happening right next to it so people were standing on the wooden buildings to get a better view, which explains all of the feet you see in these shots:






This is my favorite image, possibly of all time:


Northern Spark 2017 will be held June 10–11, starting at 9:00 p.m. Saturday and running through 5:30 a.m. Sunday. The theme is Climate Chaos | People Rising. There are seven areas to visit, all located along the Green Line light rail from the Vikings Stadium in Minneapolis to Union Depot in Lowertown, St. Paul. I believe the trains will be free that night.

Worth attending if you're in the area. Full info here.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Letters Written in Grass

I saw this in the grass alongside a gas station in Liverpool, New York:


That's UNL as in "unleaded," I guess, but I'm not totally sure how it was supposed to be used in the signage at the station.

It lay upon the grass, showing grass blades through the letters, and I knew that if I lifted it up, I'd see more letters printed by the sun:


And sure enough, there they were.